A self-hosted MQTT environment for Internet of Things – Part 3

In the last post in this series, I will add persisting of sensor data to a database. I will also use an additional subscriber as a proxy for sending the data to Adafruit IO. I will then have all data available locally, but when the Adafruit IO proxy is running, I will also have the data available in the cloud.

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A self-hosted MQTT environment for Internet of Things – Part 2

In the second post in this series, I will setup two ESP8266 microcontrollers with MQTT publishing through a Raspberry Pi-hosted Mosquitto broker. The idea is that the microcontrollers will send sensor data (like temperatures or other events) that one or several MQTT subscribers can act on.

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A self-hosted MQTT environment for Internet of Things – Part 1

MQTT (MQ Telemetry Protocol) is a lightweight machine-to-machine communication protocol that works on top of TCP/IP and it is very much suited for usage in an Internet-of-Things scenario. MQTT uses the publish-subscribe pattern where the clients subscribe to topics and publish messages through a broker. There are many different framework implementations of MQTT as well as complete cloud services that use MQTT (Adafruit IO, CloudMQTT, ThingMQ etc). The cloud services are nice and easy to use, but if you don’t want your data uploaded to a third party storage, you can host an MQTT environment yourself and have full control of the gathered data. Even if you decide to upload data to the cloud, the local MQTT environment can work as a gateway where data goes out to the Internet only from one single place on the Intranet. This makes it easier to control and change the outgoing data flow.

In this post I will show how I have self-hosted an MQTT environment with the help of a Mosquitto broker running on a Raspberry Pi and let two different ESP8266 microcontrollers publish sensor data through the broker. I will also use the Raspberry Pi as a subscriber for the messages, and these data will be persisted in a MongoDB database. Another subscriber will route the messages to a cloud service.

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Daemonize that Python script!

This post builds on a previous experiment where I made a remote control app for my outlets with a Raspberry Pi, Python/Flask and AngularJS. For the backend to be really useful, I want to make it behave as a service in Linux. It should start automatically after a reboot and there should be some control mechanism for manually starting, stopping and viewing the status of the service. There should also be a proper logging in place.

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